Archive for September, 2007

Oct. 6- BETH JOSELOW, PHYLLIS ROSENZWEIG, ALDON NIELSEN

Posted in Uncategorized on September 18, 2007 by M. Ball

Beth Joselow has been writing poems all her life. She has been publishing poetry, prose and plays since her early twenties, and her work has appeared in numerous magazines and anthologies. She often has worked with artists and musicians. Three of her poems were composed into a song-cycle by Janet Peachy. Her collaboration on an artists book with the Russian artist Pavel Makov was chosen for the Osaka Triennial in the late 1990s. Her plays have been staged in New York and Washington DC. Begin At Once is her eighth book of poems. Others include The April Wars, Broad Daylight, Excontemporary,
Self-Regard, and The Bottleneck.
For many years, Beth Joselow taught on the faculty of the Corcoran School of Art + Design. She is now a psychotherapist working mostly with children. She lives near the Atlantic Ocean in Lewes DE with her husband and a large dog

Phyllis Rosenzweig Was introduced to contemporary writing via workshops (with Peter Schjeldahl and Tony Towle) and readings at the St. Mark’s Poetry Project in New York City in the early 1970s. Moved to Washington, D.C. in the Summer of 1974 to work at the Hirshhorn Museum. Met Doug Lang in D.C. and, at his reading series at Folio Books and informal workshops, first met Lynne Dreyer, Tina Darragh, Peter Inman, Joan Retallack, Diane Ward, and was introduced to a larger community of writers. Since 1995, with Diane Ward, has been publishing Primary Writing – – the sixth issue of which (April 1996) was a broadside featuring work by Jessica Grimm and Peter Seaton. Publications include the chapbooks: Seventeen Poems (O Press, 1975); Dogs (Edge Books, 1996); and Reasonable Accommodation (Potes and Poets Press, 1997).

Aldon Lynn Nielsen is the George and Barbara Kelly Professor of American Literature in the Pennsylvania State University ‘ s Department of English. Born in the middle of the last century, in the geographical middle of the United States , to a recently-off-the-farm and now middle-class family, Nielsen soon exhibited a proclivity for the coastal extremes. Following a family move to the nation ‘ s capital, Nielsen spent the better part of three decades in the District of Columbia , where he received a Bachelor ‘ s degree from the Federal City College and a Doctorate in Literature from the George Washington University . He also spent a brief stint as a social worker in upstate New York , courtesy of the Selective Service. Following completion of graduate school and a short period teaching at Howard University , Nielsen moved to California , where he held positions at San Jose State University , the University of California in Los Angeles and Loyola Marymount University.

Nielsen was the first winner of the Larry Neal Award for poetry and has to date published five volumes of verse: Heat Strings, Evacuation Routes, Stepping Razor, VEXT and Mixage. His poetry was selected by John Ashbery for the Best American Poems anthology and has also received two Gertrude Stein Awards for innovation. He has presented poetry readings at many venues, including the Folger Shakespeare Library, U.C. Berkeley, the University of Wisconsin , the University of Iowa and the City Council Chambers of the District of Columbia . His first volume of literary criticism, Reading Race, won the SAMLA Studies Prize, a Myers Citation and the Kayden Award for best book in the humanities. Subsequent works of scholarship include Writing between the Lines, C.L.R. James: A Critical Introduction, Black Chant and Integral Music: Languages of African American Innovation. Every Goodbye Ain ‘ t Gone, an anthology of experimental poetry by black American artists co-edited with Lauri Ramey, was the winner of the Josephine Miles Award.

These days, Nielsen divides his time between Pennsylvania and California , where his wife, Anna Everett, is Chair of Film and Media Studies at U.C. Santa Barbara. He often finds himself flying over the place of his birth, the only somewhat inappropriately named Grand Island , Nebraska .

His Poetry includes-

Heat Strings- SOS Press 1985

Evacuation Routes: A User’s Guide- Score Press 1992

Stepping Razor- Edge Books 1996

Vext- Sink Press 1998

Mixage: Tenerife, Canary Islands- Zasterle Press 2005

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from Sept. 15- DOUG LANG, TERENCE WINCH, BETSY ANDREWS

Posted in Uncategorized on September 17, 2007 by M. Ball

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Doug Lang

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listening

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Doug

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Doug

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Doug

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Terence Winch

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Terence

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Terence

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Betsy Andrews

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Betsy

Sept. 15- Doug Lang, Terence Winch, Betsy Andrews

Posted in Uncategorized on September 5, 2007 by M. Ball

Doug Lang – born & raised in Wales-  has been in D.C. since 1973.

Autodidact

Doug teaches writing at the Corcoran – He ran the Folio reading series from 1976 – 1978.

His influence is constantly expanding-

voracious, prolific, generative, unrelenting, forgiving, forgoing, utterly contagious & BRILLIANT

some of his works-

Magic Fire Chevrolet (Titanic Books 1980)

Hot Shot (Jawbone press)

Lumbering and Tingling: Sonnets (1989)

Horror Vacui (1991)

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A Selected Poems is forthcoming from EDGE BOOKS- 2008

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 Terence Winch’s latest book is a collection of poems called Boy Drinkers (Hanging Loose, 2007). His previous books include Irish Musicians/American Friends (Coffee House, 1985), which won an American Book Award, The Great Indoors (Story Line, 1995), winner of the Columbia Book Award, The Drift of Things (The Figures, 2001), and a short-story collection called Contenders (Story Line, 1989). His last book, That Special Place: New World Irish Stories (Hanging Loose, 2004), draws on his experiences as a founding member of the highly regarded Irish band Celtic Thunder. His work is included in the Oxford Book of American Poetry, three Best American Poetry collections, and Poetry 180, and in such journals as The Paris Review, New American Writing, The American Poetry Review, The New Republic, Smartish Pace, and Verse. Winch―whose work has been featured on the Poetry Daily website, “The Writers Almanac,” and NPR’s “All Things Considered”received an NEA Fellowship in poetry and a Fund for Poetry grant, among other awards. The Bronx-born son of Irish immigrants, he composed the popular song “When New York Was Irish” and recorded three albums with Celtic Thunder. Just released is a new CD anthology of his Irish compositions called When New York Was Irish: Songs & Tunes by Terence Winch. (See http://www.terencewinch.com)

Betsy Andrews is the author of “New Jersey,” the winner of the 2007 Brittingham Prize (University of Wisconsin Press). She is also author of the chapbooks, “She-Devil” (Sardines Press, 2004) and “In Trouble” (Boog, 2005), and the artist’s book, “Supercollider,” a collaboration with artist Peter Fox. Her work has appeared most recently in Twenty-Six, Five Fingers Review, PRACTICE, O Poss, and Torch. She is the recipient of a 2007 NY Foundation for the Arts fellowship in poetry.

from Sept. 1- Narrow House / Lame House Reading

Posted in Uncategorized on September 5, 2007 by M. Ball

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listening

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Justin Sirois & Gina Myers

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 Dustin Williamson

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 M. Magnus

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 Arlo Quint

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 Cathy Eisenhower

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 Matt Hart

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Jamie Gaughran-Perez